bon-appeteats:

Miniature asparagus cake. Based off this cake: [link]I think I am insane. Well, if not before, then definitely after this. Made from polymer clay. I tried going for 1:12 scale but I think it’s just a little larger than that. :/And yes, I did make each individual asparagus.Total time: I lost track at the 6 1/2 hour mark.
61 pieces of full asparagus, about 240 tips, give or take a few. :P

bon-appeteats:

Miniature asparagus cake. Based off this cake: [link]

I think I am insane. Well, if not before, then definitely after this.

Made from polymer clay. I tried going for 1:12 scale but I think it’s just a little larger than that. :/

And yes, I did make each individual asparagus.

Total time: I lost track at the 6 1/2 hour mark.

61 pieces of full asparagus, about 240 tips, give or take a few. :P

(via lookatthislittlething)

477 notes

"Often after a series of unsuccessful suicide attempts, perpetrators of suicide by proxy arrived at the decision to commit a murder. Sometimes they selected a specific child as their victim; at other times they chose a victim quite at random—killing “the next best child” that crossed their path. Immediately after the deed, they presented themselves at the local jail or the town hall and alerted the startled authorities to the murder. As in Schickin’s case, their confessions were spontaneous and uncoerced. Unlike in other capital crimes, such as classic infanticide, for example, judicial torture was not applied in cases of suicide by proxy. The perpetrators made the motive of the killings explicit and explained why they chose murder over suicide. For example, in 1746 when Johanna Martauschin, an inmate in the prison-workhouse at Spandau, turned herself in for the beating death of the small child of a fellow inmate, she confessed, “She committed the murder due to weariness with life, she murdered a child and not herself, because she believed that the child would now surely be saved, whereas she as a suicide would have gone to the devil, but now she could still be converted.”"

Suicide by Proxy: The Unintended Consequences of Public Executions in Eighteenth-Century Germany } Kathy Stuart, Central European History

1 note

thedailywhat:

Seasonal Fruit Infographic of the Day: Love fruit but hate doing research? Chasing Delicious has done the saintly work of compiling the seasonal availability of fruits, vegetables and herbs into a series of eye-pleasing infographics. Never eat an out-of-date date ever again.
[explore]

thedailywhat:

Seasonal Fruit Infographic of the Day: Love fruit but hate doing research? Chasing Delicious has done the saintly work of compiling the seasonal availability of fruits, vegetables and herbs into a series of eye-pleasing infographics. Never eat an out-of-date date ever again.

[explore]

(Source: thedailywhat, via chrryblssmninja)

6,170 notes

so true… or at least, as close to the truth as my limited data points imply =) 

so true… or at least, as close to the truth as my limited data points imply =) 

0 notes

"Our analyses indicate that: (i) for 23 of the 24 diseases, the majority of individuals will receive negative test results, (ii) these negative test results will, in general, not be very informative, as the risk of developing 19 of the 24 diseases in those who test negative will still be, at minimum, 50 - 80% of that in the general population, and (iii) on the positive side, in the best-case scenario more than 90% of tested individuals might be alerted to a clinically significant predisposition to at least one disease."

The Predictive Capacity of Personal Genome Sequencing } Science Translational Medicine

In three words: environment pwns genome.

0 notes

"Can the American gun-rights movement ever go too far, politically? In Florida, prosecutors and police associations opposed Stand Your Ground, to no effect. Since the law was passed, the number of “justifiable homicides” has tripled. Last year, according to the Tampa Bay Times, “twice a week, on average, someone’s killing was considered warranted.” This week, the state attorney in Tallahassee, Willie Meggs, told the Times, “The consequences of the law have been devastating around the state. It’s almost insane what we are having to deal with.” Gang members, drug dealers, and road-rage killers are, according to Meggs, all successfully invoking Stand Your Ground. “The person who is alive always says, ‘I was in fear that he was going to hurt me.’ … And the other person would say, ‘I wasn’t going to hurt anyone.’ But he is dead."

Comment: Emmett Till in Sanford : The New Yorker

"

Of course, the music may have played only a bit part in the overall conquest of the South Pole. And, as Ernest Shackleton later learned, not all music was a recipe for catching a potential penguin dinner. As Fen Montaigne writes in Fraser’s Penguins:

One of his men pulled out a banjo and began playing “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary,” which, as Shackleton recounts in South, “The solemn looking little birds appeared to appreciate.” The bagpipe, however, was another story, and when a Scottish member of the expedition began to play the national instrument, the Adelies “fled in terror and plunged back into the sea.”

"

A Different Kind of Dinner Bell in the Antarctic | Food & Think

0 notes

"Lee Hirsch and Cynthia Lowen, the filmmakers who made the moving documentary “Bully,” don’t try to answer any questions. They avoid charts and graphs, talking heads and sociology. Their approach is more direct and, perhaps, more effective. They chose as their subjects five youths from different parts of the country. As the movie begins, two of them are dead."

“The Hunger Games,” “Bully” Reviews : The New Yorker

0 notes

"Financial aid drops Harvard tuition costs down to $17,000 a year, under San Jose State’s $23,557 and even under the $19,500 it costs to go to UC Berkeley. While Princeton may be slightly more expensive ($19,830) than UC Berkeley, it is still considerably cheaper than San Jose State."

Harvard is Now Cheaper than San Jose State | The Nation

Architects Levitate constructed this staircase in a London flat, where space limitations led to the creation of a library staircase that holds around 2,000 books. The staircase was designed by structural engineers Rodrigues Associates to transfer the weight of the stairs and books back to the main walls of the building. It dangles from the upper floor, thereby avoiding any complicated issues with neighbours living below. (via the Guardian.co.uk)

Architects Levitate constructed this staircase in a London flat, where space limitations led to the creation of a library staircase that holds around 2,000 books. The staircase was designed by structural engineers Rodrigues Associates to transfer the weight of the stairs and books back to the main walls of the building. It dangles from the upper floor, thereby avoiding any complicated issues with neighbours living below. (via the Guardian.co.uk)

It is when academic scientists choose to be mothers that their real problems start. Women deal with all the other challenges of being academic scientists as well as men do. Childless women are paid, promoted and rewarded equivalently to their male peers (and in some analyses at even higher rates). Children completely change the landscape for women—but do not appear to have the same effect on the careers of men. What happens when children enter the equation, and why does this change seem to impact women’s but not men’s careers?
When Scientists Choose Motherhood } The American Scientist

It is when academic scientists choose to be mothers that their real problems start. Women deal with all the other challenges of being academic scientists as well as men do. Childless women are paid, promoted and rewarded equivalently to their male peers (and in some analyses at even higher rates). Children completely change the landscape for women—but do not appear to have the same effect on the careers of men. What happens when children enter the equation, and why does this change seem to impact women’s but not men’s careers?

When Scientists Choose Motherhood } The American Scientist

3 notes

""Negrita," he said, using a term of endearment for the black-haired Victoria, "you are the daughter of a couple murdered during the dictatorship. The people who raised you aren’t your parents," he continued. She’d been kidnapped, and her identity had been changed at birth."

Print - The Daughter of the Disappeared - Marie Claire

0 notes

dvdp:

Diffusion Spectrum Imaging,  A new imaging technique, developed at  Massachusetts General Hospital, makes it possible to see in detail how neural fibers criss-cross the brain  and connect its regions. Read more
//via wanderlustmind

dvdp:

Diffusion Spectrum Imaging, A new imaging technique, developed at Massachusetts General Hospital, makes it possible to see in detail how neural fibers criss-cross the brain and connect its regions. Read more

//via wanderlustmind

2,142 notes

"

It’s nearly 4:00pm when all the teams converge on the indie room for the announcement of the three keywords. It comes via video. Yug, of ManaBar and AusGamers fame, addresses the crowd. He assures the contestants that they are certainly mad, and that everything will certainly go wrong. “It’s all part of the charm,” he says. Then he announces the three words:

Key. Badger. Suit.

Teams are out the door before the video ends, piling into the sunlight, onto the grass, onto the stairs, already throwing ideas at each other. Others huddle around their computers in tight scrums. Teams want to be prototyping within a couple of hours. Time is precious.

"

"I think they’re mad": Inside a 48 hour battle to build the best video game } Ars Technica